Welcome to Galilee College, Where Today's Education is Tomorrow's Gratification...


Email Us

COURSE DESCRIPTION

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

ACCOUNTING                    

 

ACC 111 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES I                        

Introduction to the fundamental Principles of Accounting and its relationship to business. Includes the basic accounting procedures from the business transaction through the journals and ledgers to the financial statements. Emphasis is placed on principles and procedures in accounting for receivables, payables, inventories, plant assets and payroll.

3 Semester Hours                              

 

ACC 112 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES II                       

Major emphasis is placed on the procedures involved in accounting for capital structure of corporations. Includes accounting principles for partnerships, departmental operations, home and branch activities and bond issues. Also introduced is basic Accounting procedures, fundamentals of Financial Statement Analysis and Tax Accounting.

Prerequisite: ACC 111 3 Semester Hours                    

 

ACC 211 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I                  

Theories and problems involved in proper recording of transactions and preparation of financial statements. Review of the accounting cycle, discussion of financial statements, analysis of theory as applied to transactions relating to current assets, current liabilities, long‑term investment and presentation on the Balance Sheet.

Prerequisite: ACC 112 3 Semester Hours                    

 

ACC 212 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II                 

Detailed presentation of theory applied to plant and equipment, intangible assets, long‑term debt, capital stock and surplus; correction of errors of prior periods; analysis of financial statements and statement of application of funds.       

Prerequisite: ACC 211 3 Semester Hours                    

 

ACC 214 COST ACCOUNTING I                    

A Comprehensive study of the Manufacturing Business using a job order Cost Accounting system.

Prerequisite: ACC 112 3 Semester Hours    

 

ACC 311 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING                       

This course stresses the use of accounting for Managerial planning and control. Emphasis is placed on the role of accounting in decision making. It covers retailing, wholesaling, manufacturing and administrative operations.    

Prerequisite: ACC 112 3 Semester Hours    

 

ACC 312 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING I                         

Property Acquisition, Revaluation and Retirement, Depreciation Principles and practices are studied in greater depth. Intangible Assets, Current and long‑term Debt, Pension Plans, Corporation formation and Capital Stock transactions are covered. Financial Statement analysis, Funds flow and related statements are given thorough treatment. Frequent reference is made to pronouncements by the Securities and Exchange Commission and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA).                               

Prerequisite: ACC 212 3 Semester Hours    

 

ACC 313 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING II                        

Accounting theory and current practices are studied in depth with emphasis on the concepts and standards prevailing in the accounting profession. Coverage is afforded such topics as Partnerships formation, Dissolution and Liquidation, Installment and Consignment Sales, Home Office and Branch Accounting Consolidations.               

Prerequisite: ACC 312 3 Semester Hours    

               

ACC 315 COST ACCOUNTING II                   

A Comprehensive study of the Manufacturing Business using a process Cost Accounting system and a standard Cost Accounting system. Also studied is cost data for planning, control and decision making.                      

Prerequisite: ACC 213  3 Semester Hours

 

ACC 411 PRINCIPLES OF AUDITING                           

A practical presentation of modern audit practices, emphasizing the principles and objectives of an audit. Analysis of the audit basis, the best standards, objective reporting, the adoption of improved accounting standards, business controls, professional ethics, and legal liability. 

Prerequisite: ACC 212 3 Semester Hours

 

ACC 421 INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAXES

The Internal Revenue Code, the various income tax acts, and problems of the preparation of U.S. tax returns are studied as they relate to the individual. Emphasis is placed on the determination of income and statutory deductions in order to arrive at the net taxable income.

Prerequisite: ACC 312 3 Semester Hours

 

ACC 422 CORPORATE INCOME TAXES

The U.S. Internal Revenue Code and the various income tax acts are studied as they relate to partnerships, estates, trusts, and corporations. Federal estate tax return problems are considered. Methods of tax research are integrated into each of the areas studied.

Prerequisite: ACC 421 3 Semester Hours

 

ACC 431 ACCOUNTING INTERNSHIP

Provides qualified students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for supervised professional training and experience in an actual work environment. This Internship is an ongoing seminar between the student, the faculty member and the employment supervisor. It involves a Learning Contract, periodic meetings with the faculty representative, professional experience at a level equivalent to other senior-level courses, and submission of materials as established in the Learning Contract. Participation cannot be guaranteed for all applicants.

Prerequisite: ACC 411, ACC 421 3 Semester Hours

 

 

BIBLICIAL & THEOLOGICAL

 

BIB 111 BIBLICAL INTRODUCTION

A Study of the formation of the Bible, and survey of the principles And practice of independent Bible study including an emphasis on the grammatical historical interpretation of the Bible.                                        3 Semester hours

 

BIB 121 NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE

The literature of the New Testament in its historical setting. Study of the New Testament background, the life of Christ, the apostolic age, life situations of the New Testament books, and the structure and message of each New Testament book. 3 Semester hours

 

BIB 211 HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY

Survey of church history from the Apostolic Church through the Reformation and Counter Reformation period of 1500 - 1648 . Emphasis on the impact of concepts, individuals, and events on the development of church history. 3 Semester hours

 

BIB 221 THEOLOGY OF THE CHRISTIAN LIFE

A study of some of the basic doctrines of the Christian life and the out working of these doctrines in the personal life and in various types of ministry. 3 Semester hours

 

 

 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION              

 

BA 121 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS                       

A study of the characteristics and functions of business in the free enterprise environment. Including opportunities, ownership, management, organization marketing, physical plant, personnel, finance, ethics and law.

Prerequisite: ACC 212 3 Semester Hours    

 

BA 122 GENERAL BUSINESS LAW                               

Law is studied in relationship to the proper conduct of business including consideration of the nature and source of law, court, and courtroom procedure. Course includes a survey of basic laws concerning contracts, agency, partnership and corporation.                     

Prerequisite: BA 121 3 Semester Hours                        

 

BA 123 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT                     

This course is an analysis of modern methods, decision making process and motivational procedures. Included are the basics of planning, organizing, directing, coordinating and controlling.                  

Prerequisite: BA 121 3 Semester Hours        

 

BA 211 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT                

A study and analysis of the problems of operating a small business. Additionally, a discussion of the hows, whats and whys an individual would consider in developing their own business. Other areas covered include; marketing, financial controls, government regulations and strategic planning.                              

Prerequisite: BA 121 3 Semester Hours        

 

BA 212 ADVANCED BUSINESS LAW                           

Building on the basic understanding of the Uniformed Commercial Code in areas of sale of goods, students will be introduced to commercial paper, Property, Trust and wills and environmental and zoning laws.             

Prerequisite: BA 122 3 Semester Hours

 

BA 221 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

An overview of international business with emphasis on how international business transactions differ from domestic. International business transactions, practices and environments influencing these activities will be explained and illuminated through extensive case studies.

Prerequisite: BA 123 3 Semester Hours

                               

BA 223 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT             

Study of the personnel function in business. Areas of activity will include staffing, recruitment, training and development, wage and salary administration, job analysis, evaluation, and labor relations.   

Prerequisite: BA 123 3 Semester Hours        

 

BA 322 PRODUCTIONS & OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT       

Studies the basic problems facing the industrial manager such as plant location, various layouts, workflow problems, product research and plant safety. 

Prerequisite: BA 123 3 Semester Hours                        

 

BA 332 ORGANIZATION BEHAVIOR              

Behavior Sciences of understanding and effectively managing organizations, with emphasis on developing theoretical understanding and behavioural capability individual work group or organizational levels. Models of growth, structures, decisions, leadership, communication, conflict, change, and other variables are discussed. A review of management techniques processes, with emphasis on problem solving. A case study approach is utilized.   

Prerequisite: BA 123 3 Semester Hours                        

 

BA 341 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES   

This program allows for the student to receive supervised work experience in the student's major area in an approved position in a related business field.     

Prerequisite: BA 332 3 Semester Hours        

 

BA 345 TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT

A study of the importance of employee development and training toward achievement of organizational goals and effectiveness. Explores and defines the origin of the role of human resources development as a function of human resources management. Studies current training and development practices for organizational improvement and effectiveness.

Prerequisite: BA 223 3 Semester Hours                        

 

BA 347 COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS

An introduction to a systematic framework for identifying and designing compensation systems that add value to organizations. Topics include compensation system components, strategic and behavioral compensation frameworks, technical processes for compensation, and the implementation, management and evaluation of individual and group pay systems.

Prerequisite: BA 223 3 Semester Hours        

 

BA 411 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

Includes economic, legal, political, governmental, financial and cultural issues related to international business environment and the multidisciplinary development of strategies to address it. Focuses on opportunities for, threats to, and options facing the multinational or multicultural business enterprises, emphasizing host government, work force, and consumer needs, preferences, and demands and strategies for responding to them.

Prerequisite: BA 332 3 Semester Hours        

 

BA 412 Staffing

This course examines all aspects of getting employees into organizations. Recruitment and selection are the foci. This course covers scientific and legal issues from a managerial perspective and examines the usefulness of various methods used in job analysis, testing and measurement, and internal and external market analysis. Legislation regarding EEO and affirmative action programs are discussed.

Prerequisite: BA 347           3 Semester Hours

 

BA 413 Special Topics in HRM

A variable content classroom course in human resources management in which students pursue topics or subjects of current interest that are not part of the regular curriculum. A specific course description will be published in the Course Schedule for the trimester the course is offered.

Prerequisite: BA 347           3 Semester Hours

 

BA 421 Strategic Human Resources Management

Capstone course for HRM majors. Investigates the strategic management process from the HR perspective. Topics include strategic HR, strategic alignment, balanced scorecard and competitive strategic analysis. Intensive use of case analysis, including a cross-functional senior practicum with students from Finance, Marketing and Management Information Systems majors.

Prerequisite: BA 347           3 Semester Hours

 

BA 423 Managing the Human Resources Enterprises

Managing the human resources enterprise operates on two levels. In this course students will learn how to model good leadership through the careful stewardship of human resource operations. Students all will extend the strategic view of leadership developed in other courses, identifying successful models of effective human resource operations and leadership.

Prerequisite: BA 347           3 Semester Hours

 

BA 431 STRATEGIC PLANNING & MANAGEMENT   

Introduction to methods for maximizing competitiveness in the industrial and macroscopic environment. Focuses on the importance of, key issues reflected in, and effective methods for, corporate goal formulation, internal and external analysis, business- and corporate-level strategy, and supportive organizational structures, processes, and systems. Includes case analyses. Assignments include analysis, evaluation, and if needed, modification or design of strategy for existing company, deliverable as a term project as well as consultant report to a client. 

Prerequisite: BA 411 3 Semester Hours

 

BA 433 BUSINESS POLICY

This is the capstone course in management and should be taken in the last or second to last term of the undergraduate program.  It provides a synthesis of previous course material within the program.  It is operated as a seminar and individual and group projects that demonstrate managerial competencies are a major portion of the course.  A major thrust of the course is the application of concepts learned in the classroom to real world problems.

Prerequisite: BA 431 3 Semester Hours

 

BA 441 DECISION MAKING AND PROBLEM SOLVING

Decision making and problem solving processes in organizations, utilizing logical and creative problem solving techniques. Application of theory is provided by experiential activities such as small group discussions, case studies, and the use of other managerial decision aids. 

Prerequisite: BA 431 3 Semester Hours

 

 

 

COMMUNICATIONS                     

 

COM 111 INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATIONS     

This course places emphasis on the history, contributions, and contemporary status of mass communications. Includes; newspapers, magazines, books, radio, television, and sound recordings.                    

3 Semester Hours              

 

COM 112 THEORIES OF COMMUNICATION                               

A survey of dominant theories in language and meaningful information and persuasion, as well as contextual theories of interpersonal, group, and organizational communication. The process of theorizing as a useful logical tool for extending the findings of research.   

Prerequisite: COM 111       3 Semester Hours                              

 

COM 121 COMMUNICATIONS INTERNSHIP                              

Students majoring in communications are required to complete a 3‑semester internship in any communication industry. This could television, book/magazine publishing, recording, advertising.                 

Prerequisite: COM 112       3 Semester Hours                              

 

COM 211 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC RELATIONS                 

This introductory course examines the function of Public Relations in our social and economic systems and discusses the methods, techniques, and procedures used to implement public relations.                                            

3 Semester Hours                              

 

COM 221 DYNAMICS OF COMMUNICATION                              

Through lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory experiences, students learn current theories of communication and improve their skills in communicating personally and through media. Group and individual analysis of dynamics of communication processes. 

Prerequisite: COM 112       3 Semester Hours                              

 

COM 222 COMMUNICATIONS AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR        

How does communication in interpersonal situations affect behavior? Analysis of how communi-structures human situations, how particular communication patterns may engender difficulties, and how understanding of communication can help resolve problems.

Prerequisite: COM 112       3 Semester Hours                              


 

COM 225 PUBLIC OPINION AND PROPAGANDA                      

This course explores the nature of public opinion, propaganda, the role of the media in its formation, and how the media is influenced by public opinion.    

Prerequisite: COM 112       3 Semester Hours              

               

 

COMPUTER SCIENCE                

 

CS 111 WORD PROCESSING CONCEPTS                 

A complete overview of word processing to include equipment, functions, organization and terminology. Lab time provided in addition to class time for "hands on" experience to develop technical skills.                                                            

3 Semester Hours                              

 

CS 112 WORD PROCESSING MANAGEMENT                           

A course designed to increase students knowledge of system selection and implementation, personnel selection, training, equipment features, design, office ergonomics, and system management.                             

Prerequisite: CS 111          3 Semester Hours              

               

CS 113 DATA BASE ENTRY                            

This course allows students to understand the concepts of a computer management filing system. Includes: file organization, information update, and basic record keeping. 

3 Semester Hours                              

                               

CS 114 EXCEL ‑ BEGINNING                         

This lab course introduces the fundamentals of EXCEL. The student is taught the concepts of building applying spreadsheets for business uses. Because this is a beginners course, no previous Computer course is needed.         

3 Semester Hours                              

 

CS 115 EXCEL ‑ ADVANCED                         

A continuation of CS 114, EXCEL ‑ Advanced, offers additional topics such as, what‑if projections, replication, and graphing. Certain graphic programs attached to LOTUS will be explored.                             

Prerequisite: CS 114          3 Semester Hours                              

 

CS 121 INTRODUCTION TO DATA PROCESSING     

A course which familiarizes students with basic concepts and terminology utilized in the applications of computers to business.                                           3 Semester Hours                              

 

CS 131 COMPUTER CONCEPTS                  

A study of advanced data communication theory, secondary storage facilities and job control language provides the student with experience that is suited to many applications.           

Prerequisite: CS 121          3 Semester Hours                              

 

CS 141 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS

An introduction to professional business application software in the areas of spreadsheets and databases.

Prerequisite: CS 121          3 Semester Hours                              

 

CS 151 PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS

This course provides an introduction to programming concepts, such as flow charting, writing, compiling and debugging. The students learn the software development process from problem definition to final product; understand and use the basic components of a programming language; package code into functions to enable reuse; identify and correct different types of programming errors; evaluate the performance of programs; and produce clear, easy-to-maintain code. No previous programming experience is required. Both procedural and object-oriented languages are discussed.       

Prerequisite: CS 121          3 Semester Hours              

 

CS 153 VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING

In this course, the student will learn VB control structures, such as branching and looping; functions and procedures; arrays; string, date, and time manipulation; graphics; and basic Graphical User Interface (GUI) concepts, and mouse and keyboard controls.  Students learn programming concepts using a project-centered approach. 

Prerequisite: CS 121          3 Semester Hours              

 

CS 155 C PROGRAMMING

In this course, the students learn basic C programming concepts, including: control structures; functions; arrays; pointers and strings; and manipulation of bits, characters, and strings. The students learn how to: write, compile and execute standard C programs; make full use of C's powerful structured programming features; access operating system services; and develop programs using standard C library functions. 

Prerequisite: CS 151          3 Semester Hours                              

 

CS 157 PROGRAMMING C++

In this course, the student will be exposed to object oriented programming using Microsoft Visual C++. Students learn how to: utilize the object-oriented capability of C++; build C++ classes using polymorphism and inheritance; safely manage memory within C++ classes; define C++ functions using default arguments and cast operators. This course will include both theory and hands-on practical exercises.

Prerequisite: CS 155          3 Semester Hours              

 

CS 159 ADVANCED VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING

In this course, the student learns error handling and debugging; file and record processing; ActiveX; linking to a database; networking; multimedia, including images, animation, and audio; data structures; and creating and printing reports. Rapid Application Prototyping methods are emphasized throughout the course.

Prerequisite: CS 153          3 Semester Hours              

 

CS 216 COMPUTER DESK PUBLISHING                    

This course is designed to introduce the concept of Desk‑Top‑Publishing. Students will be introduced to several desk top publishing programs. In addition to this, other programs such as EXCEL and Word Processing will be used as publishing programs Experience will be gained in the production of newsletters, flyers, catalogs, and other publications.          

Prerequisite: CS 115          3 Semester Hours                              

 


CS 222 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING - BASIC I

This first course in BASIC provides the student with instruction in the fundamentals of the language. Topics covered include simple input/output operations, loop construction, logical comparisons, array, menus, subroutines and elementary string processing.              

Prerequisite: CS 121          3 Semester Hours                              

 

CS 223 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING ‑ BASIC II        

This is a more in-depth study of BASIC Programming.                              

Prerequisite: CS 222          3 Semester Hours                              

 

CS 231 STRUCTURED PROGRAMMING                      

This course introduces the concepts of structured programming and top‑down, BASIC programming language. Also included are such topics as menu driven programs, array, string processing, file handling, and user defined utilities.

Prerequisite: CS 223          3 Semester Hours                              

 

CS 232 SYSTEMS ANALYSIS                         

The study of systems analysis skills focus on down approach. Includes structured design techniques, Data Flow Diagrams, HIPO charts, and top‑down top‑down computer program development and testing.                  

Prerequisite: CS 231 3 Semester Hours       

 

CS 243 INTRODUCTION TO THE INTERNET

Students will become proficient with key Internet applications, including electronic mail, file transfer, browsing, and searching. Each student will design a personal web page. The advantages and disadvantages of various Internet connection technologies will be discussed. Designed for the non-CIS major.

Prerequisite: CS 121 3 Semester Hours

 

CS 245 DATA STRUCTURES

Manipulation of character strings and data (searching, sorting, etc.) file processing, program segmentation, linearly linked lists, matrices, trees and graphics, stack and queues will be covered using the language of C++.             

Prerequisite: CS 157 3 Semester Hours

 

CS 247 MANAGING AND MAINTAINING PC’S (A+)

This courses will map to current A+ Certification exams. Topics covered will be: understanding and managing memory, installation and support, troubleshooting, supporting I/O devices, multimedia technology, power, support (of 9x, NT, and 2000), communications, viruses, and maintenance plans.

Prerequisite: CS 121 3 Semester Hours       

 

CS 251 WEB MARKETING

This course introduces the student to the process of electronic buying and selling of goods and information. The student will learn what electronic commerce is, how it is being conducted and managed, and its major opportunities, limitations, issues and risks. The course acquaints the student with a general understanding of the technology behind E-Commerce. A required one-credit lab accompanies this course. Basic computer skills would be helpful, but are not a prerequisite to the course.

Prerequisite: CS 121 3 Semester Hours       

 

CS 255 INTERNET PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES

This course is designed to teach students about the Internet and how to effectively use it. Emphasis will be placed on the World Wide Web, e-mail and newsgroups. An introduction to Hyper Text Mark-up Language (HTML) and web page design will also be included.

Prerequisite: CS 243 3 Semester Hours       

 

CS 259 WEB PAGE DESIGN TOOLS

This course is designed to give students hands-on experience with software applications used to design, enhance and maintain web pages. Students will work with web page development at progressive levels of sophistication, including the beginning text-based; the intermediate graphics-based; and the advanced animation-enhanced levels. Topics to be covered will include the ground rules of web page design; the fundamentals of image creation and editing; web page navigation and links to external sites; and creating frames, image maps and forms on both text-based and graphics-based web pages. 

Prerequisite: CS 243 3 Semester Hours

 

CS 261 FUNDAMENTALS OF WEB DESIGN

This course will apply effective graphic design methods and techniques to the web. Students will be able to write HTML code directly, as well as, be able to use HTML code generators, like Dreamweaver or Microsoft Front Page. The course will emphasize the creation of web pages that are displayed properly in multiple browsers.

Prerequisite: CS 151          3 Semester Hours              

 

CS 262 DATA COMMUNICATIONS AND NETWORKING

This course provides a general introduction to data communications and computer networking that would be useful to all personnel who deal with distributed systems.

Prerequisite: CS 151          3 Semester Hours                              

               

CS 263 E-COMMERCE TECHNOLOGY

This course is designed to acquaint the students with the Infrastructure of e-commerce and the technology issues involved in designing, creating, and maintaining businesses on the web. Topics to be covered will include web hosting, Markup Languages, network protocols, client-server architecture, payment systems, digital signatures, Internet security, Internet malls, sample e-stores, ethical issues and taxation on the Web.

Prerequisite: CS 261          3 Semester Hours                              

 

CS 265 E-COMMERCE PRACTICUM

The participant has the opportunity to apply the skills that they have developed in the course to the creation of an actual business web site in the practicum section of the program.

Prerequisite: CS 263          3 Semester Hours                              

 

CS 267 INTRODUCTION TO ORACLE SQL

Data Modeling and Relational Database Design (DMRDD), including the use of Entity Relationship (ER) modeling is discussed in detail using practical business examples. Normalized, stable, maintainable and well-defined relational databases are analyzed. Rules and constructs of Structured Query Language (SQL) and SQL*Plus, including various elements of the SELECT statement, will be used to create, store, retrieve, and manipulate data in an Oracle database.       

Prerequisite: CS 151          3 Semester Hours                              

 

CS 271 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING ‑ COBOL I                       

This provides a foundation for the use of COBOL. Emphasis on the fundamentals of structured program design, development, testing, implementation and documentation of common business‑oriented application using the COBOL programming language. Coverage of language syntax, basic input/output operation, arithmetic operations, report formatting, accumulation of intermediate and final totals, report editing, program decision making, multiple page reports, control break logic (single and multiple), table processing, file creation, access and reporting including data editing and validation.

Prerequisite: CS 121          3 Semester Hours                              

 

CS 272 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING ‑ COBOL II      

This course provides the student with advanced concepts of the COBOL programming language. Covered include trial, relative and indeed sequential file organization, access methods, the language's feature and debug aids.                       

Prerequisite: CS 272          3 Semester Hours                              

 

CS 311 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS                    

An introduction to systems analysis and design. Includes the determination of information needs and data collection facilities necessary to provide them: effect of computer use on existing organizations: and evaluation of systems effectiveness.                             

Prerequisite: 131                 3 Semester Hours                              

 

CS 312 INTRODUCTION TO MICRO‑COMPUTERS   

This course introduces all areas of computing. This includes data processing, computer concepts, word processing, data base, spreadsheet, computer base systems, computer creations and designs, Basic Programming and introductory COBOL. 3 Semester Hours

 

CS 321 COMPUTER BUSINESS PROCESSING                         

This is designed to assist students with some accounting and record‑keeping for selected business transactions. Selection includes; inventory, accounts payable/receivable, sales, purchasing, bank interest and mortgage amortization schedules.                      

Prerequisite: CS 115          3 Semester Hours                              


 

CS 331 DATA BASE PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT                      

Introduction to application program development in a database environment with emphasis on loading, modifying and querying the database using a host language. Discussion and application of data structure, indirect/direct file organizations, model of data including hierarchical, network and relational. Discussion of storage devices, data administration and data analysis, design and implementation.

Prerequisite: CS 321 3 Semester Hours       

 

CS 332 ADVANCED DATA BASE CONCEPTS                           

Investigation and application of advanced data base concepts including database administration and technology, as well as, selection and acquisition of database management systems. In-depth practicum in data modeling and system development in a data base environment. Overview of future trends in data management.

Prerequisite: CS 331 3 Semester Hours                       

 

CS 411 Information Systems Infrastructure

Study of information system architecture including networks, processors, clients, operating systems, middleware, database management systems, information warehouses, groupware, EDI, DSS, systems management, interoperability, benchmarking, security, and disaster protection. The focus in to enable the student to understand, design, and analyze current and proposed information technology configurations.

Prerequisite: CS 311          3 Semester Hours

 

CS 413 Information Technology Management

Examines the current issues and approaches to the management of information technology (IT). Through assigned reading, case discussions and projects, students confront the complex issues associated with IT management. The underlying theme of this course is that effective IT management requires an understanding of the IT, the organizational/commercial environment in which it will be applied, and basic business, organizational and managerial concepts.

Prerequisite: CS 311          3 Semester Hours

 

CS 421 Introduction to Data Warehousing.

The course covers the fundamentals of developing and using a data warehouse. Students learn to develop requirements, create a dimensional model and generate population and maintenance plans for a warehouse. Students also learn to manipulate the data in the warehouse for update, maintenance and data extraction and to generate effective business intelligence output.

Prerequisite: CS 311          3 Semester Hours

 

CS 423 Project Management

Ttis course focuses on the management of systems development projects, including their implementation within an organization. The course begins with overviews of the software development context, system development approaches and project management concepts and then focuses on project planning, organizing controlling and recent technological advances in software development.

Prerequisite: CS 311          3 Semester Hours

 

 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

 

CJ 111  INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE

An undergraduate study and overview of the criminal justice system emphasizing the "system", its legal actors and its political constraints. Designed for the beginning student in law enforcement, criminology, corrections, sociology, social welfare, government and pre-law.                        3 Semester Hours

 

CJ 113  LAW ENFORCEMENT

A comprehensive survey of city, state and federal law enforcement agencies with an emphasis on rolls and functions (law enforcement, order maintenance, public service) and responsibilities (constitutional rights and community relations) including organizational and management aspects.

Prerequisite: BA 122                  3 Semester Hours

 

CJ 121  THE COURTS

This course is an introduction to how this nation’s court system works to administer justice. The course examines the various roles of the court system participants. The course examines all stages of the court proceedings. It is not designed for those planning a career as an attorney, but rather is designed for those planning a career as a criminal justice professional.

Prerequisite: CJ 113                  3 Semester Hours

 

CJ 123  CORRECTIONS

This is a didactic and education course regarding the criminal justice system of corrections, which offers a functional analysis of corrections in the American justice system. The course covers and explores various aspects of the: social history of punishment, environmental conditions, staff and inmate safety, prisoner rights litigation, overcrowding, gender and ethnicity, special needs, gang control strategies, and growth of supermax prisons. It also delves into a unique perspective on the rights of victims of crime and the duties of the correctional system to serve such victims. Prerequisite: CJ 1213 Semester Hour

 

CJ 131  VICTIMS OF CRIME

The role of victims in crimes, their treatment by the criminal justice system, their decisions to report crimes and help prosecute offenders, victim assistance, and victim compensation.

Prerequisite: CJ 113                  3 Semester Hours

 

CJ 133  GANG THEORY, PRACTICE AND SUPPRESSION

This course covers issues dealing directly with gang theory not limited to but including understanding street gangs, also graffiti, and violence. This course will help the learner by explaining gang practices, communications, structure, and enforcement techniques as well as the nature of gangs in the United States. Prerequisite: CJ 121             3 Semester Hours

 

CJ 212  CRIMINAL PROCEDURES AND EVIDENCE

This course is an introduction to criminal evidence and criminal procedure. It is not designed for those planning a career as an attorney, but rather is designed for those planning a career as a criminal justice professional. Prerequisite: CJ 113                        3 Semester Hours

 

CJ 214  CRIMINAL LAW

This course is an introduction to criminal law. It is not designed for those planning a career as an attorney, but rather is designed for those planning a career as a criminal justice professional. Criminal law varies significantly from state to state.

Prerequisite: CJ 121                  3 Semester Hours

 

CJ 222  LEGAL ISSUES IN LAW ENFORCEMENT

The issues of law enforcement agencies in American jurisprudence; the laws of arrest and rules of evidence. The examination of the full range of rights in criminal justice not only in philosophical and social terms, but also in terms of specific cases, including the rights of the accused and extending to the rights of convicts, witnesses, victims, ex-convicts, journalists, and the more generalized rights of participation by advocacy groups and individuals, taxpayers, and citizens in criminal justice policy and administration. Prerequisite: CJ 212               3 Semester Hours

 

CJ 231  PROBATION AND PAROLE

This course is an overview of the complex "real world" of probation and parole. It explores the cutting-edge of both practice and theory with regard to all aspects of adult and juvenile probation, institutions, and parole.

Prerequisite: CJ 212                  3 Semester Hours

 

CJ 233  JUVENILE JUSTICE

This course is an introduction into juvenile justice. It explores all phases of the contemporary juvenile justice system and examines the nature of delinquency, classifications of juvenile offenders, alternative explanations for juvenile misconduct, juvenile courts and juvenile rights, and corrections.

Prerequisite: CJ 212                  3 Semester Hours

 

 

 

COUNSELING                    

 

CON 131 INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING

Identification of communication and counseling skills for working with all age groups. Topics: active listening skills, counseling process, empathic responding, overcoming barriers to communication, assets and limitations of para-professional helpers, and counseling ethics. Participation and skills practice format. Prerequisite: One course in general or developmental psychology or consent of the instructor.                3 Semester Hours              

 

CON 141 CHRISTIAN PSYCHOLOGY AND COUNSELING

The student is provided with general information regarding basic theories concerning historical systems of psychology and counseling. 3 Semester Hours 

 

CON 151 BASIC CHRISTIAN COUNSELING

This course gives the student an overview of the "Big Eight" (types of secular counseling/therapeutic methods). Also, students will be taught differences between Christian and secular counseling, goals, techniques, and several other important topics, such as the dangers and pitfalls of counseling. 3 Semester Hours

 

CON 181 COMPETENT TO COUNSEL

Basic counseling principles for the pastor and Christian worker. Using biblical directed discussion, basic counseling works by means of the Holy Spirit to bring about change in the personality and behavior of the counselee.

3 Semester Hours

                                                                               

CON 183 INNOVATIVE APPROACHES TO COUNSELING

This course provides a refreshing approach to people-helping. The course provides carefully though-out conclusions with a careful use of Scripture. It avoids repetition and provides practical, simple formulas with evidence as to why they work.

Prerequisite: CON 131       3 Semester Hours              

               

CON 191 COUNSELING AND CHILDREN

The course is designed to equip the counselor with an understanding of the basic principles of child development in order to effectively help children. The course provides instruction and encouragement to the Christian counselor who seeks to minister to the developmental, emotional and spiritual needs of children.

Prerequisite: CON 131       3 Semester Hours              

 

CON 211 COUNSELING THEORY, PHILOSOPHY, AND ETHICS

This course is designed as a lecture/discussion course to provide students with an overview of historical and current theories of counseling. Students will also review the foundations of ethical decision-making, professional ethical standards, and codes of conduct.

Prerequisite: CON 131   3 Semester Hours  

               

CON 241 PASTORAL COUNSELING

The student will be provided with a complete analysis of the pastoral counseling process. It will include the purpose, stages, and methods of changing behavioral patterns in counseling. It will also include a biblical look at the structure and organization of the New Testament Church.

Prerequisite: CON 131       3 Semester Hours              

 

CON 285 COUNSELING THE DEPRESSED

This course teaches how to effectively counsel persons who are suffering from depression by defining principles that underlie therapeutic help. Studies, among others, the following topics: popular misconceptions about depression, problems of depression, what is clinical depression, preparing to counsel a depressed person and counseling the suicidal person.

Prerequisite: CON 131       3 Semester Hours              

 

CON 311 CAREER COUNSELING

This course is designed to help students link theory to practice in career counseling through the development of understanding, appreciation, and skills for facilitating successful career development in schools, rehabilitation, and community settings. Students will also learn about the unique needs of diverse populations. Learning is achieved through lectures, readings, and experiential activities such as simulated interviews, assessment completion and interpretation, and occupational exploration and interpretation. Upon completion of this course, students should have an understanding of the complexity of career counseling and should have developed preliminary career counseling skills.

Prerequisite: CON 211       3 Semester Hours              

 

CON 321 COUNSELING IN TIMES OF CRISIS

This course presents the dynamics of a crisis and the scriptural view of crisis. Student will learn how to better understand the issues confronting those who are going through a crisis. Presents principles that will be useful for future reference.             

Prerequisite: CON 211       3 Semester Hours

               

 

ECONOMICS                      

 

ECO 211 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I                    

A basic study of Economic and cultural changes with research into the economic system, its development by free competition under the capitalistic system. The nature and evolution of money; the banking system, price determination and wages, a consideration of monopoly, the law of supply and demands, and public production control. 3 Semester Hours            

 

ECO 212 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS II                   

This includes a study of the tool for economic analysis, the market system price theory, theory of the firm, and theories of production distribution.          

Prerequisite: ECO 212 3 Semester Hours                    

 

ECO 323 CREDIT AND COLLECTIONS                        

This course is designed to stress the function of the credit department within a business and the role of local credit bureaus.                

Prerequisite: ECO 212 3 Semester Hours                    

 

ECO 331 PRINCIPLES OF INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS     

A study of the fundamentals of international trade, international monetary policies, theories of foreign exchange, the balance of payments and the international monetary system.        

Prerequisite: ECO 212 3 Semester Hours                    

 

ECO 332 LABOR RELATIONS                         

Policies applying to labor management relations are studied, particularly in relation to the employer's side.                               

Prerequisite: ECO 212 3 Semester Hours                    

 

ECO 334 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

Application of economic theory to decision making in the business firm. Demand and cost analysis, including demand forecasts; pricing policy of individual enterprise, capital budgeting; production analysis; uses of operations research methods.

Prerequisite: ECO 212 3 Semester Hours

 

ECO 341 CURRENT ISSUES IN ECONOMICS                            

A study of the underlying causes and available solutions to unemployment, inflation, monopolies, poverty, and income distribution. Government economic policies and other problems are examined.                      

Prerequisite: ECO 212 3 Semester Hours    


 

ECO 351 INTERNSHIP IN FREE ENTERPRISE

Development and Implementation of projects in school and community environments with the objective of free enterprise education, under direction of a faculty member.

Prerequisite: ECO 332 3 Semester Hours

 

EC0 353 COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS

Comparative study of alternative economic systems. Emphasis is given to the institutions and principles which guide the use of scarce resources to want satisfaction. Particular attention is given to the operation of actual economic systems concerning the extent to which they are market directed or government directed.

Prerequisite: ECO 332 3 Semester Hours

 

ECO 411 Tourism Economics

Introducing tourism as an important economic sector; evaluating and analyzing tourism in relation to such topics as balance of payments, income and employment. Throughout the course special emphasis will be given to the environmental and social aspects of tourism.

Prerequisite: ECO 341       3 Semester Hours

 

ECO 413 Decision Economics

This course will deal with the analysis of economic decisions; the economic and financial aspects; cash flows; planning horizon; interest rates; the decision environment; external factors such as market growth, competitors, money and banking conditions; decision criteria and preferences; short vs long term preferences; attitude towards risk; tangible vs intangible benefits; subjective and objective assessment of economic decisions.

Prerequisite: ECO 341       3 Semester Hours

 

ECO 421 Economic Theories

The development and analysis of major schools of thought from mercantilism to Adam Smith and from Adam Smith to John Stuart Mill. In the first part of the course the emphasis is on Mercantilism and Physiocracy. The second part of the course deals with the classical theorists starting from Adam Smith and detailed examination of the works of the classicists such as Ricardo, Malthus and Say is undertaken . The course ends with a thorough discussion of the works of John Stuart Mill.

Prerequisite: ECO 341       3 Semester Hours


ECO 423 Transportation Economics

The rising importance of transportation costs in the globalization process of world markets and international trade; the role of transportation in economic development; the effects of transportation services as an invisible expenditure and for revenue on the balance of payments; pricing of transportation services; transportation and location theory.

Prerequisite: ECO 341       3 Semester Hours




EDUCATION                       

 

EDU 111 INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD

This course includes an overview of the history, theories, and curriculum models of early education. Emphasis is on current trends/issues, with a review of state/national regulations. Characteristics of quality programs and professional teachers are explored in the course..

3 Semester Hours

 

EDU 113 OBSERVATION AND GUIDANCE

A study of the principles of guidance and the development of skills to meet children’s needs individually and in groups, with an emphasis on promoting a positive and constructive climate in the early childhood setting. Classroom management techniques including organizing environments, scheduling, assessments, parent-teacher communication and related areas will be covered.

3 Semester Hours

 

EDU 115 CHILDREN’S PHYSICAL GROWTH

Focuses on the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive domains of the infant, preschool child, and school-age child; developmental milestones and developmental issues application to the early childhood classroom.

3 Semester Hours

 

EDU 117 CHILDREN’S ENVIRONMENT

For home or care centers with 2 1/2 - 5 year-old children. Includes the needs of the child; components of the physical and social environment; assessing, choosing, presenting and evaluating developmentally appropriate environments.

Prerequisite: EDU 113 3 Semester Hours

 

EDU 211 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT & PROGRAM LEARNING

This course covers early childhood curriculum development and planning. Topics include philosophy, curriculum, indoor and outdoor environmental design, scheduling, observation and assessment, and instructional planning and evaluation. Upon completion, students should be able to assess children and curriculum; plan for daily, weekly, and long-range instruction; and design environments with appropriate equipment and supplies.

Prerequisite: EDU 113 3 Semester Hours

 

EDU 213 CHILDREN’S LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

This course covers the history, selection, and integration of literature and language in the early childhood curriculum. Topics include the history and selection of developmentally appropriate children’s literature and the use of books and other media to enhance language and literacy in the classroom. Upon completion, students should be able to select appropriate books for storytelling, reading aloud, puppetry, flannel board use, and other techniques.

Prerequisite: EDU 211 3 Semester Hours

 

EDU 217 CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL LEARNING NEEDS

This course introduces working with children with special needs. Emphasis is placed on the characteristics and assessment of children and strategies for adapting the home and classroom environment. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize atypical development, make appropriate referrals, and work collaboratively to plan, implement, and evaluate inclusion strategies.

Prerequisite: EDU 211 3 Semester Hours

 

EDU 219 SUPERVISED FIELD EXPERIENCE I

This course includes emphasis on planning, implementing, and evaluating scheduled programs, age-appropriate methods, materials, activities, and environments of early childhood principles and practices. Prerequisite: All previous curriculum courses.

Prerequisite: EDU 211 3 Semester Hours

 

EDU 220 SUPERVISED FIELD EXPERIENCE II

This course emphasis is on planning, implementing and evaluating scheduled programs, age-appropriate methods, materials, activities and environments in all areas of responsibility in programs dealing with young children

Prerequisite: EDU 219 3 Semester Hours    

 

EDU 221 EARLY CHILDHOOD INTERNSHIP

This course provides work experience with a college-approved employer in an area related to the student's program of study. Emphasis is placed on integrating classroom learning with related work experience. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate career selection, demonstrate employability skills, and satisfactorily perform work-related competencies.

Prerequisite: EDU 211 3 Semester Hours

 

EDU 223 EARLY CHILDHOOD ADMINISTRATION

Study the various tasks and responsibilities of program administration. Topics include licensing, program planning, organization, financial management, parent and community relationships, and personnel management. Prior ECE coursework and experience working with children in groups is highly recommended.

Prerequisite: EDU 211 3 Semester Hours

 

 

ENGLISH                 

 

ENG 111 COLLEGE ENGLISH I                      

Systematic study of English fundamentals: grammar, punctuation, mechanics, sentence structure, vocabulary rules and conventions that govern acceptable and efficient English usage, with explanations, examples and drills in language operations.        3 Semester Hours               

               

ENG 112 COLLEGE ENGLISH II                     

A continuation of College English I. This course gives the student a more in-depth study of the English usage.          

Prerequisite: ENG 111 3 Semester Hours    

 

ENG 211 PUBLIC SPEAKING                         

This course develops the ability to speak clearly and effectively before an audience; to develop the ability to think and express ideas effectively; also plan, compose, and deliver speeches and talks of various kinds.

3 Semester Hours

 

ENG 212 DEBATE                             

Determining and praising the issues, gathering evidence, planning and outlining the speech, and practice in debating.          

Prerequisite: 112 3 Semester Hours              

 

ENG 215 POETRY                              

The study of self‑expression through poetry. This class will consist of reading and appreciation of classic poems, but the main emphasis will be on the creation of poetry to express moods feelings and imagery.                            

Prerequisite: 112 3 Semester Hours              

               

ENG 221 SHORT STORY INTERPRETATION                               

The short story is presented with a view to help the students understand, and enjoy and appreciate more fully any story which they may read.

Prerequisite: ENG 112 3 Semester Hours                    

 

ENG 311 CREATIVE WRITING                        

This is an advanced writing course which attempts to encourage and develop freelance ability in the communicative arts. Students will write and criticize their own arts in sight of modern critical thought and development.       

Prerequisite: ENG 112 3 Semester Hours                    

 

ENG 312 SCIENCE FICTION                           

The art of Science Fiction is presented in this course with a view of helping students understand, enjoy and more fully appreciate that they may encounter. A serious effort is made to attempt to place science fiction as a major development in modern literature.                      

Prerequisite: ENG 112 3 Semester Hours                    

 

ENG 321 JOURNALISM                    

A survey of news gathering, writing, copy reading, typography, and business management, with specific relation to local newspapers and also college public relations.                           

Prerequisite: ENG 112 3 Semester Hours                    

 


ENG 341 BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE                

The purpose of this course is to examine the wide variety of business correspondence as it is used in today's business community. Some of the areas studied are: The Business Letter, The Formal and Informal Business Report, Influential and Explicit Communication, dictation and oral communication.                  

Prerequisite: ENG 211 3 Semester Hours                    

 

 

FINANCE                 

 

FIN 111 PERSONAL FINANCE                       

Examination of the complexities of money management, personal and family budget, consumer credit operations, borrowing money, banking service, nature of investments, the various types of insurance, home ownership, taxation and retirement plans.        

3 Semester Hours                              

 

FIN 112 PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE                               

This study of money and financial markets including stock and bond markets; commercial banks and their competitors as participants in the market for money and the importance of Central Bank Reserve Policy on their operations.                                      

3 Semester Hours              

 

FIN 211 MONEY AND BANKING     

Study of the demand for funds and its supply by business, consumers government, and foreign sector financial institutions, instruments and policies.                        

Prerequisite: ECO 212 or FIN 112 3 Semester Hours                

 

FIN 221 PRINCIPLES OF BANKING                               

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the diversified services offered by the banking industry today. It includes new material on bank accounting, pricing and profitability, and expands the discussion on the personnel and security functions of the bank.               

Prerequisite: ECO 212 3 Semester Hours    

 

FIN 223 COMMERCIAL BANK MANAGEMENT

This course presents treasury management of financial services institutions, management of a bank's own balance sheet exposures: liquidity and cash management, management of capital, supervision and regulation. This course includes the business environment, management processes, theories, models, skills and techniques.

Prerequisite: FIN 221 3 Semester Hours       

 

FIN 231 INTERNATIONAL BANKING

A survey of the organization, structure, function and regulation of the international activities of U.S. banks. An examination is made of the role and impact of the international financial and money market activities, along with a comparison of foreign banking structure and organization with those of U.S. banks. The international lending decision process and the use made of the international banking facilities by multinational firms are also analyzed. Three credits.            

Prerequisite: FIN 221 3 Semester Hours       

 

FIN 233 CONSUMER LENDING

This course is designed to provide an overview of the consumer credit operation. It examines the role of consumer credit in overall banking operations and offers an improved understanding of the consumer credit function within a bank.

Prerequisite: FIN 221 3 Semester Hours       

 

FIN 235 BRANCH BANKING

In this course, students will learn how to effectively use accepted management principles in the banking environment. The first part of the course is dedicated to retail management, the second to sales management and the third will emphasize financial performance of banks.

Prerequisite: FIN 211 3 Semester Hours                       

 

FIN 311 PRINCIPLES OF INVESTMENT                       

The role of the exchange, used in investment vehicles, information sources, analysis and selection of investment alternatives and mechanics.                          

Prerequisite: FIN 112 3 Semester Hours                       

 

FIN 342 PUBLIC FINANCE                              

A study of the organization and administration of government revenues and expenses; emphasis will be placed on all levels of government.

Prerequisite: ACC 112 3 Semester Hours                    

 

FIN 411 Corporate Finance

Topics covered include: structure of financial systems personal and corporate sector finances; risk analysis; financial indicators and the company; share valuation and stock markets; timing of financial decisions; option pricing; financial impact of mergers; European and international influences on financial services.

Prerequisite: FIN 221          3 Semester Hours


FIN 413 Banking Law

The legal principles relating to the banker-customer relationship, banking and other financial services provided by banks, including by securities, open market operations and investment advice and services.

Prerequisite: FIN 221          3 Semester Hours


FIN 421 Portfolio Management

This course aims to provide the essential theoretical applications in the field of portfolio management. Portfolio investment and the purchase of stocks and shares. Portfolio balance theory. Money bonds and foreign assets analyzed as portfolios of financial assets.

Prerequisite: FIN 221          3 Semester Hours

 

FIN 423 Contemporary Issues in Banking & Finance

New developments in banking and finance Research, presentation and debates about contenporary issues in banking and finance

Prerequisite: FIN 221          3 Semester Hours

 

HOTEL & RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT                 

 

H/R 111 INTRODUCTION TO HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY                           

A survey of the interrelated hospitality enterprises that are a major component of tourism, expected to be the number one business in the world by the year 2000. The student will be introduced to the nature and operations of lodging, foods, beverage,      meeting, and leisure time services.                      

3 Semester Hours

 

H/R 121 FOOD SERVICE PRINCIPLES I                       

Classroom study of the basic theory, characteristics and principles necessary for Food service operations. Topics addressed are menu planning, nutrition, food characteristics, cooking, recipe costing, sanitation.                         

3 Semester Hours


 

H/R 122 FOOD SERVICE PRINCIPLES II                      

A laboratory course in which students apply and practice the theory and principles developed in H/R 121.                  

Prerequisite: H/R 121 3 Semester Hours      

 

H/R 131 HOSPITALITY SUPERVISION

This course covers principles of supervision as they apply to the hospitality industry. Topics include recruitment, selection, orientation, training, evaluation, and leadership skills. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and apply basic supervisory skills unique to the hospitality and service industry.

Prerequisite: H/R 111 3 Semester Hours      

 

H/R 211 RESTAURANT OPERATIONS                          

A laboratory course in which the student applies Food service principles in a restaurant setting. Students produce variety of menus, rotating through standard kitchen / dining room work stations. Principles include food characteristics, cooking principles, product evaluation, menu planning, presentation rules, and nutrition principles.                               

Prerequisite: H/R 115 3 Semester Hours                      

 

H/R 212 FRONT OFFICE OPERATIONS                        

A course designed to introduce the student to hotel front office operations and its interaction with other hotels which together produce expected hotel service. The distinctive nature of hotel guest accounting is studied in detail through class assignments, front desk practice and simulations. 

Prerequisite: H/R 111 ACC 111 3 Semester Hours                     

 

H/R 231 HOUSEKEEPING & PROPERTY MANAGEMENT        

Study of major duties and responsibilities associated with servicing and maintaining the hotel guest room and property facilities. Standard operational functions and procedures are addressed. With emphasis on the housekeeper's and engineer's crucial management role in the functioning of a lodging operation.          

Prerequisite: H/R 212 3 Semester Hours      

 

H/R 233 CONVENTION AND MEETING MANAGEMENT

The management of conventions and meetings is examined from both the clients' and meeting planners' perspective. The operations of conventions and meetings are analyzed from the sale to post-convention review.             

Prerequisite: H/R 212 3 Semester Hours      

 

H/R 241 HOTEL AND RESTAURANT SYSTEMS                         

A study of standard systems and procedures in hotel and restaurant management used to plan and control profitability. Emphasis given to control and budgeting principles as they apply to hospitality operations.                               

Prerequisite: H/R 231 3 Semester Hours      

 

H/R 243 HOSPITALITY/RESTAURANT INTERNSHIP

Directed internship in a department of a hotel, restaurant, or tourism enterprise.

Prerequisite: H/R 231 3 Semester Hours      

 

H/R 321 HOSPITALITY MARKETING AND SALES      

Study of the distinctive aspects of marketing the largely intangible services of a hospitality operation. Topics include the hospitality marketing concept, strategic marketing planning, sales administration, meeting, planning and convention service.

Prerequisite: H/R 231 3 Semester Hours

 

 

HUMANITIES          

 

 

HUM 111 SOCIAL STUDIES FOR THE BAHAMAS

The Social Studies for the Bahamas program gives children a greater understanding of the world in which we live and the different ways that people function. Children improve their knowledge of the world around them through age-appropriate cultural experiences and daily reminders about rules, kindness, manners, and costumes. Books and other classroom materials give children a variety of points of view. 3 Semester Hours

 

HUM 211 PHILOSOPHY                   

This course acquaints the student with the most significant directions of philosophical thought to the end that the student may be enabled to formulate his own questions, arrive at reasonable answers, and evaluate those of others.          

3 Semester Hours                              

 

HUM 221 WESTERN CIVILIZATION I                             

A study of the development of Western Civilization from Ancient Egypt to the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed on the political, social, intellectual, and economic aspects of the Graeco‑Roman world and Medieval Europe.    

3 Semester Hours                              

 

HUM 222 WESTERN CIVILIZATION II                            

A study of the development of Western Civilization from the renaissance to the present. Included is a scrutiny of the influence of liberalism, nationalism,      and modern industrialism upon political, social, economic and intellectual life.

Prerequisite: HUM 221 3 Semester Hours                    

 

HUM 251 PROFESSIONAL ETHICS                              

Critical and constructive study is given to ethical thought and ideals, with emphasis upon the central assumptions of personal and social morality. Investigation is made of the bearing of ethical theory upon problems connected with industry, civil society, and the typical American Community.

3 Semester Hours              

                               

HUM 311 LOGIC                

A study of the effective thinking based on adequate evidence and following approved procedures. Emphasis is placed on the detection of common fallacies and the method of analyzing arguments to determine their validity.

3 Semester Hours              

 

 

MARKETING                       

 

MKT 211 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING                       

This course deals with the distribution of goods from producer to consumer and covers such topics as characteristics of markets for consumers goods and industrial goods, marketing functions and the organizations that perform them, marketing methods and techniques, price policies, and the cost of marketing.                

3 Semester Hours

 

MKT 213 SALESMANSHIP                              

A study of the basic principles and techniques of selling. Development of effective presentations and communications in selling is emphasized. Selling is studied as a marketing process in retail and industrial markets.   

Prerequisite: MKT 211 3 Semester Hours     

               

MKT 214 PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING                    

A study of the principles and institutions in mass selling techniques. The student is introduced to the role of advertising as a sales and communications tool for business. Advertising methods and media are examined functionally.                    

Prerequisite: MKT 211 3 Semester Hours     

 

MKT 215 PRINCIPLES OF RETAILING                          

Surveys of the basic principles and techniques of retailing. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of merchandising, sales stock turnover, inventory and profitability. Pricing for competitive retailing and markup strategies are included.    

Prerequisite: MKT 211 3 Semester Hours                     

 

MKT 311 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR                 

An extensive study of the behavioral aspects of the marketing process from producer to consumer. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of consumer motivation and factors leading to ultimate consumer buying decisions.             

Prerequisite: MKT 211 3 Semester Hours                     

 

MKT 316 MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS                

A study of the principles and applications of communications as a force for effective marketing strategy. Included is an in-depth study of the various communication channels that are vital to the marketing systems.      

Prerequisite: MKT 211 3 Semester Hours     


 

MKT 318 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING                      

Students will examine legal, economic and cultural factors influencing marketing abroad. Studies will also include: Commercial policies, practices, and techniques needed to locate and evaluate foreign markets, as well as problems of pricing, promoting, and distributing products in international markets.                   

Prerequisite: MKT 211 3 Semester Hours     

 

MKT 321 MARKETING MANAGEMENT                         

This course is a managerial approach to the overall marketing function and includes analysis of products development, promotion pricing, physical distribution, and marketing strategy.

Prerequisite: MKT 211 3 Semester Hours

                               

 

MKT 411 Direct Marketing

Topics covered include: strategic role, control and evaluation of direct marketing; databases and list management; media, communication and planning; industry application.

Prerequisite: MKT 311        3 Semester Hours


MKT 413 Marketing Research

The objective of this course is to introduce the student to basic concept techniques and applications of marketing research. Topics covered include: History and nature of marketing research; the marketing research process; data collection and measurement; attitude research sampling; data preparation, analysis and presentation. Students will develop their research skills through practical studies.

Prerequisite: MKT 311        3 Semester Hours


MKT 421 Research Project
A research paper in the area of interest with an emphasis on marketing.

Prerequisite: MKT 311        3 Semester Hours


MKT 423 Contemporary Issues in Marketing

The objective of this course is to provide a good working knowledge of the practical aspect of marketing .The application of the concepts and techniques learned. New topics and approaches in Marketing.

Prerequisite: MKT 311        3 Semester Hours

 

 

MATHEMATICS                 

 

 

MAT 111 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS                           

This course provides instructions in time saving techniques and practice in accurate figuring using business forms and procedures and in dealing with real business situations.            

3 Semester Hours                              

 

MAT 221 COLLEGE MATHEMATICS                             

This course provides an advanced understanding of mathematical principles that may be in the business world. Logarithm, probability and statistics compose a large part of the course.      

Prerequisite: MAT 111, 3 Semester Hours                    

 

MAT 222 COLLEGE ALGEBRA                       

The algebra of sets, linear and quadratic equations, factoring, proofs, determinants, and relations and functions. Emphasis is placed on understanding the structure of mathematical systems.                                                              

Prerequisite: MAT 221 3 Semester Hours                     

 

MAT 311 BUSINESS STATISTICS                  

Business and Economics Statistics, including the arrangement and analysis of pertinent data. Use of samples from infinite data to arrive at an objective conclusion by applying various statistical tests.                

Prerequisite: MAT 221 3 Semester Hours                     

 

 

PARALEGAL

 

PL 111 INTRODUCTION TO PARALEGALISM I

Your new career in law; employment opportunities for paralegals; job hunting tips for paralegals; on-the-job realities for paralegals: assertiveness training for paralegals; the regulation of paralegals; licensing and liability; attorney ethics and paralegal ethics; an introduction to the legal system.

3 Semester Hours

 

PL 112 INTRODUCTION TO PARALEGALISM II

Legal analysis; interviewing clients, opponents, and witnesses; investigation procedures in a law office; understanding and assisting in the litigation process; legal research; legal writing; computers in today's law office; law office administration; informal and formal administrative advocacy.

Prerequisite: PL 111 3 Semester Hours                        

 

PL 211 TORTS

Basic areas of the law dealing with civil wrongs, including intentional torts, negligence, malpractice, misrepresentation, nuisance, libel; slander; defamation, product liability, strict liability, vicarious liability, and joint liability; torts in practice; tort reform action today; automobile insurance issues; bad faith; workers’ compensation issues.

Prerequisite: PL 112 3 Semester Hours                        

 

PL 213 CIVIL LITIGATION

The civil litigation process; special terminology for litigators; preparing pre-trial and post-judgment motions; drafting a complaint; serving court papers; drafting a response to a request for discovery; preparing pleadings and discovery motions; managing the case file; assisting an attorney in the courtroom.

Prerequisite: PL 112 3 Semester Hours                        

 

PL 215 CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURES

Fundamentals of substantive criminal law; procedures unique to criminal cases and the prosecution of criminal trials; an examination of the practical aspects of criminal prosecution and defense; constitution rights of the accused; types of criminal offenses; plea bargaining.

Prerequisite: PL 112 3 Semester Hours                        

 

PL 217 REAL ESTATE LAW

The law of real property; concurrent ownership of real estate; surveying a property; public regulations and encumbrances; easements; licenses; understanding and preparing legal instruments, including sales agreements, deeds, contracts, leases, deeds of trust, and mortgages; financing; real estate closings.

Prerequisite: PL 112 3 Semester Hours                        

 

PL 219 LAW OFFICE MANAGEMENT

Parameters and policies of the business of law; understanding attorney-client relationships; managing time-keeping, fees, billing, finances, client funds accounts, and office technology; using today's law office systems; docket control systems; file and records management; law library organization.

Prerequisite: PL 112 3 Semester Hours                        

 

PL 221 ADMINISTRATION OF WILLS, TRUSTS, AND ESTATES

Principles of law, and step-by-step procedures for drafting wills and trusts, and planning and administering estates; working with clients; an examination of the ethical standards and guidelines governing the responsibilities of legal assistants.

Prerequisite: PL 112 3 Semester Hours                        

 

PL 223 FAMILY LAW

The scope and practice of domestic relations law, covering marital agreements and ceremonies; common law marriages; annulment of a marriage; separation agreements; child custody and support agreements; divorce proceedings; tax consequences; legal rights of women and children; illegitimacy and paternity; adoption; surrogacy; motherhood; torts.

Prerequisite: PL 112 3 Semester Hours                        

 

PL 225 LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING

Legal research tools and techniques for today's paralegal, including retrieval of cases and researching statutory authority; using legal dictionaries and encyclopedias, legal periodicals, treatises and other documents and resources of secondary authority; proper case citation form; drafting documents, letters, memoranda, and more.

Prerequisite: PL 112 3 Semester Hours                        

 

 

PSYCHOLOGY                   

 

PSY 211 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY                               

A comprehensive survey of the diverse and rapidly expanding field of human psychological research. Emphasis is placed on understanding the dynamics of the human nervous system and how it affects our day to day behavior.       

3 Semester Hours              

               

PSY 212 APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY                 

A study of the application of the science of Psychology to understanding and shaping human behavior within the context of daily life and work.                     

Prerequisite: PSY 211 3 Semester Hours                     

 

PSY 216 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

Growth and Development from conception to maturity, including principles and processes of psychological , emotional, motor and intellectual development.

Prerequisite: PSY 211 3 Semester Hours

 

PSY 218 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

This course is designed to assist students with the application of psychological principles to classrooms at all educational levels. Topics include: cognitive development, learning theories, motivation, multicultural issues, and student assessment. Course activities include the use of instructor and guest lectures, small group discussions, and student presentation.

Prerequisite: PSY 211 3 Semester Hours

 

PSY 221 INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY                          

Specific application of psychological principles in reference to personnel selection training, human engineering, motivation, morale, supervision, and work efficiency.    

Prerequisite: PSY 211 3 Semester Hours                     

 

PSY 222 PSYCHOLOGY INTERNSHIP                          

This program allows the student to work in an area in which he/she has interest. Under the care of a professional, emphasis is placed on behavior disorders and behavioral development. Students are encouraged to participate as much as possible in dealing with patients.               

Prerequisite: PSY 212 3 Semester Hours     

 

PSY 311 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY                            

An examination of abnormality in terms of current knowledge concerning mental health. Topics include mental illness and treatment, social disorders, organic and psychotic disorders, child psychosis, and disorder of mood and emotion.

Prerequisite: PSY 211 3 Semester Hours     

               

PSY 321 PERSONALITY THEORIES                              

A look at various personalities and an in‑depth study of the major theories of personality. Emphasis is placed on applying knowledge of personality development to enhance students human relations skills.   

Prerequisite: PSY 211 3 Semester Hours     

 

PSY 323 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

A study of institutions, communications, belief and value systems, and other aspects of social organizations as these effect individual and societal behavior.

Pre requisite: PSY 211 3 Semester Hours

 

PSY 331 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCH‑THERAPY                       

Major theories of counseling. Emphasis is on the development of basic therapeutic skills.              

Prerequisite: PSY 212 3 Semester Hours     

 

PSY 341 THEORIES OF GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING

An over view of the various theories of guidance and counseling which form the basis for guidance, counseling, and therapeutic technology.

Pre requisite: PSY 321 3 Semester Hours

 

PSY 411 Business Psychology

This course is concerned with theoretical and practical knowledge in business and psychology.  Integration and application of theoretical business and psychological perspective must be taken into account in determining the missions and strategic objectives of an organization.  There will be an examination of  international business relationships.

Prerequisite: PSY 311        3 Semester Hours

 

PSY 413 Professional Issues in Psychology

This unit will focus on ethical, legal and professional issues related to psychological practice. Conceptual (eg theories and definitions) and practical issues (eg common ethical dilemmas and case study appraisals) will be addressed. Some of the issues to be addressed include: legislation governing psychologists, professional organizations, codes of professional conduct, and ethical issues raised by: conflicts of interest, children as clients, using psychological tests, and the provision of psychological services to a multi-cultural population, managing the suicidal client, the reporting of child abuse, and service delivery over the internet.

Prerequisite: PSY 311        3 Semester Hours

 

PSY 421 The Psychology of Persuasion

This course focuses on the psychology of influence, and has applications for marketing, non-profit organizations, the service industry, and consumers.  The ethics of compliance techniques will also be discussed.  A business negotiation can be broken down into simple psychological principles. 

Prerequisite: PSY 311        3 Semester Hours


PSY 423 The Psychology of Group Dynamics in Business

(4)This course examines the influence of culturally diverse group characteristics, motivations, attitudes and behaviors on productivity in the workplace.  Comparisons will be made between the influence of individualistic and collectivistic thought structures on group interactions.  Students will have the opportunity to develop their skills in conflict resolution, communication, meeting management, and team building. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or permission of the instructor

Prerequisite: PSY 311        3 Semester Hours

 

 

 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

                               

PA 111 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION          

Introduction to concepts, processes and methods involved in administration of public agencies. This course includes the survey of approaches used in the study of Public Administration.            

3 Semester Hours                              

 

PA 211 PUBLIC POLICY                   

Public Policy focuses on the development and content of public policy in the Bahamian political system. Include discussions on local government. The American political system will also be emphasized.                                                  

3 Semester Hours                              

 

PA 213 PUBLIC PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION                      

This is a study of basic properties, practices, and issues of public personnel administration; including recruitment, management, motivation, and ethics in public service.                        

Prerequisite: PA 111 3 Semester Hours

               


PA 214 PUBLIC FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION         

This emphasizes the budget process as related to programs conditioned by revenue estimates based upon taxes, assessments, and appropriations.                    

Prerequisite: PA 111 3 Semester Hours                        

 

PA 221 PROGRAM PLANNING & EVALUATION                         

This is an introduction to the techniques of program planning and evaluation as a government process.     

Prerequisite: PA 111 3 Semester Hours        

 

PA 225 PUBLIC BUDGETING

Budgeting as a fiscal management tool is examined within the political decision making process. Several budgetary techniques such as line-item, performance budgeting, PPBS, and Z-B B will also be studied.

Prerequisite: PA 214  3 Semester Hours                       

 

PA 231 PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION INTERNSHIP      

This program allow students to work in any area of the public sector for exposure. This internship can be done in any governmental environment, including public utilities.           

Prerequisite: PA 111 3 Semester Hours

 

PA 311 GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

This course examines the structure, philosophy, accomplishments and failings of the American government. Students will examine and analyze why the American political system operates as it does, who wins and who loses in the process and why this system endures.  The students will also compare both the American and Bahamian Government Systems.  

Prerequisite: PA 111 3 Semester Hours

 

 

                               

SCIENCE

 

 

SCI 113 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY

This is an introductory level course that introduces the student to the concepts of biology. The basic theme is to help the student acquire knowledge about living organisms. Both plant and animal organisms are included in the course study. The application of this knowledge is specifically related to human endeavors and to the relationship of humans to their environment. The course includes the study of various disciplines of plant and animal biology. An emphasis is placed on morphology, anatomy, physiology, and the cellular and chemical basis of life. The scientific method will also be emphasized in terms of how scientists uncover new information and apply it to solve real problems. 3 Semester Hours

 

 

SECRETARIAL SCIENCE                       

                               

SSC 111 INTRODUCTION TO TYPING                          

This is a beginner's typing course. The student will learn the keyboard and other basic techniques. Credit is given when the student passes a comprehensive test and demonstrates the ability to type accurately at 30‑40 words per minute.                    3 Semester Hours

                               

SSC 112 INTERMEDIATE TYPING                 

Emphasis is on speed, accuracy, and rhythm. Emphasis is also on the development of skills in typing a variety of office documents, and on the production of mailable copy. Credit is given when the student passes a comprehensive test and demonstrates the ability to type accurately 45 to 55 words per minute.           

Prerequisite: Ssc 111 3 Semester Hours                      

 

SSC 113 ADVANCED TYPING                        

Development of advanced techniques with preparation of correspondence, tabulated reports, manuscripts, legal papers, and a variety of business forms and documents. Credit is given when the student passes at 55‑60 words per minute.          

Prerequisite: Ssc 112 3 Semester Hours                      

 

SSC 115 OFFICE PRACTICE                          

This course will prepare students to develop the necessary skills to work both independently and dependently in the 21st century office.  With the emergence of new technologies, a diversified workplace environment, and the expanding marketplace, students need to be ready to meet these challenges.  Topics covered include the following:  office productivity, ethical behavior, office mail, office communications, meetings and conferences, travel arrangements, office technology, and career advancement. 

                               

SSC 121 DOCUMENT FORMAT I

This course covers the touch technique for alphabetic, numeric and symbol key reaches utilizing computers and appropriate software.  This course develops mastery of the keyboard as well as formatting, basic business correspondence, simple reports, tabulated documents, employment documents and skill building activities.

Prerequisite: Ssc 115 3 Semester Hours                      

 

SSC 211 APPLICATIONS

Emphasizes the development of decision‑making skills and completing documents, preparing typed letters, reports, tabulations, handwritten drafts, and in transcribing machine dictation. Maintenance of professional habits and production level is stressed. Credit is given when the student passes a comprehensive test and demonstrates the ability to type accurately at 60 wpm. Prerequisite: Ssc 113 3 Semester Hours 

 

SSC 221 ADMINISTRATIVE DATABASE MANAGEMENT

This course introduces students to the way data is managed in the office. Introduction to organizing information for storage in microcomputer-based database management software packages. Topics include: relational database design and planning; evaluating and choosing appropriate software packages; determining access points for effective information retrieval.

Prerequisite: CS 113 3 Semester Hours                       

               

SSC 222 SHORTHAND I                  

This course is devoted to the presentation of the principles of Gregg Shorthand and develops a basic shorthand vocabulary. Dictation is given throughout the course. 3 Semester Hours                         

SSC 223 SHORTHAND II                 

The work offered in this course completes the studies of shorthand principles and increases the vocabulary and speed skill of the student beyond the level reached in the first course.

Prerequisite: Ssc 222 3 Semester Hours

 

SSC 225 CREATING PRESENTATIONS

This course develops skills in using PowerPoint and Outlook needed for the expert user. In creating presentations using PowerPoint, students will learn to add visual elements, bring data in from other sources, modify and customize a presentation, and prepare presentations for distribution. Students will learn to use Outlook to organize their work and to communicate with others by using all the components of Outlook such as the journal, notes manager, mail client, contact and task managers, and calendar. Integrating PowerPoint and Outlook with other programs and the world wide web will also be taught.

Prerequisite: CS 111, CS 114, CS 115 3 Semester Hours

 

SSC 231 OFFICE ADMINISTRATIVE INTERNSHIP

An experience external to the college for an advanced student in a specialized field involving a written agreement between the educational institution and a business or industry. Mentored and supervised by a workplace employee, the student achieves objectives that are developed and documented by the college and that are directly related to specific occupational outcomes. This may be a paid or unpaid experience. Prerequisite: Ssc 224 3 Semester Hours

               

SSC 232 RECORDS MANAGEMENT                            

An introduction to the use and management of the various records in a functioning business office. The student will learn the techniques and rules governing the filing of business papers.

3 Semester Hours                              

 

SSC 235 DOCUMENT FORMATTING II

This course will improve keyboarding, editing and word processing software skills.  Areas covered will include document format review, editing and language arts skills and keyboarding speed drills.  Word processing software will be used in producing various keyboards of business correspondence, tables, business forms, business reports and administrative/employment communications.  

Prerequisite: Ssc 121 3 Semester Hours                      

 

SSC 311 PROFESSIONAL DICTATION                         

This course is designed to train the professional secretary to attain expert speed in dictation and transcription. Numerous business letters shortcuts and speed pointers are employed. Transcription of office style dictation and extended dictation sessions are included. Credit is given when the student passes a comprehensive test and demonstrates the ability to take technical and unfamiliar dictation at 100‑120 wpm and transcribe it at 25wards per minute.             

Prerequisite: Ssc 222 3 Semester Hours      

               

SSC 332 SECRETARIAL INTERNSHIP

This program is designed to ensure that the secretarial student receives practical experience. The student will be exposed to all areas in Secretarial Science.

Prerequisite Ssc 311 3 Semester Hours

 

SSC 321 Professional Development

Emphasis is placed on developing job search skills and human relations skills. Each student will prepare an employment package which includes a resume, application letter, and job application form. (Career Course)

Prerequisite: SSC 235        3 Semester Hours

 

SSC 331 Trends in Office Technology

This course addresses current trends in office technology. Emphasis is on technology relevant to the office environment such as electronic mail, multimedia interaction, presentation hardware and software, and Internet use. Upon completion, the student should be aware of current technological applications for the modern office.

Prerequisite: SSC 235        3 Semester Hours

 

SSC 411 Special Topics in OA

This course is an in-depth study of topics of special interest under the direct supervision of an instructor. Emphasis is on the use of modern technology to study, research and improve skills in a specialized office support area. Upon completion, the student should be able to demonstrate enhanced knowledge and/or skills gained through an individualized project.

Prerequisite: SSC 235        3 Semester Hours

 

SSC 413 Administrative Project Management

Provides a capstone experience in the Office Administration program. This course offers both a theoretical and a practical hands-on approach to managing complex business projects. Students learn the life cycle of a project and develop essential skills to define the critical path of a project. Students integrate spreadsheet, text-editing, presentation, transcription, and project management skills to develop and track a comprehensive team-based project.

Prerequisite: SSC 235        3 Semester Hours

 

 

SOCIOLOGY                       

 

SOC 221 PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY                       

Study is made of man's cultural heritage, of the cultural influence of human nature and personality, and of social interaction. Special attention is given to current social problems.               

3 Semester Hours                              

 

SOC 241 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY

Selected topics in an identified area of Sociology

3 Semester Hours

 

SOC 321 CRIME AND DELINQUENCY                         

A study of such pertinent issues: Social movement drug abuse, interpersonal violence, sexual deviance and poverty, with particular reference to the juvenile population.                              

3 Semester Hours              

 

 

Galilee College - Joe Farrington Road - P.O. Box EE 16-507 - Nassau, Bahamas (242)364-8202
© Copyright Galilee College 2004-2008 – All Rights Reserved Disclaimer
Send comments, questions about this Web site to Galilee College